How do we call oxeye daisy in French?

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This morning we went on a nice family walk in our neighbourhood. The Park of Maisons-Laffitte is a great place to stroll on a Sunday morning as most people are still in bed or eating croissants at breakfast for a long long time. On the Place Wagram, the elegant fountain is surrounded by beautiful oxeye daisies. I took a few photos and thought about writing a post about how do we call oxeye daisy in French. Here is the answer as well as a few more information such as the game of picking the daisy petals off…


How do we call oxeye daisy in French?

MARGUERITE is the name! The latin word of the grassland flower is Leucanthemum vulgare which derives from the Ancient Greek meaning ‘white flower’. A native plant to Europe, the oxeye daisy was later introduced to North America, Australia and New Zealand.

Marguerites Maisons-Laffitte 02 © French Moments

The symbolic meaning of the oxeye daisy is Patience. It blooms for the whole summer from late spring to autumn.


The loves me daisy petal game

Oxeye daisies should not be confused with common daisies or Bellis perennis (in French: pâquerettes).

Both flowers are used in the game of plucking the daisy petals. As a person is picking one petal off a daisy, he/she speaks the phrase:

He/she loves me, he/she loves me not.

Marguerites Maisons-Laffitte 05 © French Moments

In French the game is called ’effeuiller la marguerite’ and says:

“elle (il) m’aime, un peu, beaucoup, passionnément, à la folie… pas du tout”

(he/she loves me a little, a lot, passionately, madly… not at all)

On picking off the last petal, the phrase spoken is supposed to represent the truth between the object of their affection loving him/her… or not!

Marguerites Maisons-Laffitte 01 © French Moments

Marguerites Maisons-Laffitte 03 © French Moments

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About Author

Pierre is a French/Australian who is passionate about France and its culture. He grew up in France and Germany and has also lived in Australia and England. In 2014 he moved back to Europe from Sydney with his wife and daughter to be closer to their families and to France. He has a background teaching French and holds a Master of Translating and Interpreting English-French with the degree of Master of International Relations and a degree of Economics and Management.

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