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Is it necessary to present Dijon, the historic capital of Burgundy and a Mecca of French gastronomy? The prefecture of the Côte d’Or offers visitors a rich and exciting architectural and cultural heritage. But beyond the city of the Dukes of Burgundy, there are many sites to explore. Of course, the vineyards of the Côtes de Nuits, but also natural sites, beautiful ruins, and charming localities. What are the 15 places to see in the region around Dijon? Follow the guide and let’s go on a trip less than 40 km from the centre of Dijon!

 

Around Dijon

What does Dijon mean to you?

Fallot’s Dijon mustard?

Fallot moutarderie store © French Moments
Fallot moutarderie store © French Moments

 

Burgundian gastronomy?

Discover the Dijon Gastronomy © French Moments
Discover the Dijon Gastronomy © French Moments

 

The timber-framed houses of the historic centre?

Fine half-timbered houses in Rue Amiral Roussin, Dijon © French Moments
Fine half-timbered houses in Rue Amiral Roussin, Dijon © French Moments

 

Beautiful gothic churches?

The chevet of Dijon cathedral © French Moments
The chevet of Dijon cathedral © French Moments

 

The charming Place de la Libération?

Dijon in Burgundy © French Moments
Place de la Libération and the Ducal Palace of Dijon © French Moments

 

Dijon is all this… and much more!

But for now, let’s go outside the city walls to explore its surroundings…

 

Staying around Dijon

To plan your accommodation around Dijon, click on this link to booking.com or browse the map below:



Booking.com

 

What to see around Dijon?

Let’s get to the heart of the matter with 15 ideas of what to see around Dijon.

Dijon is located in the north of a very touristy wine region… To avoid having to write an encyclopaedia on the subject (!!), I have voluntarily limited myself to a small selection of 15 destinations within a maximum radius of 40 km.

► Do you have any suggestions for visits around Dijon? Write them in the comments at the bottom of the article!

Here are the 15 places we will discover around Dijon:

  1. Mont Afrique and Notre-Dame d’Etang
  2. Fixin, Fixey and Gevrey-Chambertin
  3. Château du Clos de Vougeot
  4. Nuits-Saint-Georges
  5. Butte de Vergy
  6. Aloxe-Corton
  7. Savigny-lès-Beaune
  8. Beaune
  9. Abbaye de Cîteaux
  10. Saint-Jean-de-Losnes
  11. Auxonne
  12. Talmay
  13. Valley of the Venelle
  14. Sources of the Seine
  15. Châteauneuf-en-Auxois

To help you, I have included links to the corresponding tourist offices for most destinations around Dijon. Do not hesitate to go there to get personal information on natural or cultural sites to discover, hikes to follow or the program of upcoming events.

Let’s start this little trip around Dijon with a site close to the city centre and yet so exotic!

 

Mont Afrique

Summit 13 km southwest of Dijon

Mont Afrique is one of the prominent peaks of the Côte d’Or, a group of hills dominating the Saône plain between Dijon and Beaune.

The summit reaches an altitude of 600 metres. Mount Afrique can be recognised from Dijon by its radio tower standing on a high tabular hill. To reach it, take the D108G towards Corcelles-les-Monts.

Mont Afrique offers many possibilities for hiking. The summit tour is one of the favourite walks of the people of Dijon. It provides fine views of the region around Dijon: the Saône plain to the east, the Ouche valley to the north and, on a clear day, the Alps and Mont Blanc to the south.

Mont Afrique and Notre-Dame d'Etang © Anthospace - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Mont Afrique and Notre-Dame d’Etang © Anthospace – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Notre-Dame d’Etang

Not far from Mont Afrique, the monument to Notre-Dame d’Etang is a landmark in the landscape for visitors arriving in Dijon from the Ouche valley, whether by the canal, train or road.

Notre-Dame d'Etang © Samuel Marcillet - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Notre-Dame d’Etang © Samuel Marcillet – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The monument dates from 1896 and consists of an octagonal chapel topped by a lantern tower, supporting a colossal Virgin and Child statue.

There is a beautiful view of the Ouche valley and its surroundings from the monument.

 

Fixin

Village 12 km southwest of Dijon

Located in the vineyards around Dijon, the wine village of Fixin (pronounced “fissin”) has a beautiful Romanesque church. Saint-Martin de Fixin dates from the 12th and 15th centuries.

Saint-Martin Church in Fixin © French Moments
Saint-Martin Church in Fixin © French Moments

In the village, you can also discover the Fixin washhouse, one of the most beautiful washhouses in Burgundy. It dates back to 1827 and is fed by a source of ferruginous water.

 

The Noisot Museum and Park

On the heights of Fixin, the Museum and Park Noisot of Fixin is a “Napoleon I Museum”, including a forest park developed in the 19th century.

 

Fixey

In the hamlet of Fixey (pronounced “fissay”) is another, much older church. Rising above the vineyards, Saint-Antoine de Fixey was built in Romanesque style in the 10th and 12th centuries. Note the glazed tile roof, which is more elaborate than the Fixin church.

Saint-Antoine Church in Fixey © French Moments
Saint-Antoine Church in Fixey © French Moments

 

Gevrey-Chambertin

The village of Gevrey-Chambertin is located on the Route des Grands Crus along the Côte de Nuits. Its Grand Cru wines (including the famous Chambertin) enjoy a worldwide reputation for prestige.

In the upper part of the village, the Castle of Gevrey-Chambertin is an 11th-century fortress with a 2.3-hectare vineyard.

Castle of Gevrey-Chambertin © Christophe.Finot - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Castle of Gevrey-Chambertin © Christophe.Finot – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The Sires de Vergy built the castle with its square towers. They gave it to the Abbey of Cluny in the 13th century.

The church of Saint-Aignan dated to the 13th century and was remodelled in the 14th and 15th centuries. See its beautiful Romanesque portal.

Church of Gevrey-Chambertin by Urgan. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
Church of Gevrey-Chambertin by Urgan. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

Website of the tourist board of Gevrey-Chambertin

 

Clos de Vougeot

Castle 20 km south of Dijon

Surrounded by vineyards, the Clos de Vougeot castle is a symbolic place in Burgundy. It deserves to be called the Acropolis of Burgundy!

Clos de Vougeot © French Moments
The Clos de Vougeot nestled in the vineyards of Burgundy © French Moments

The Clos de Vougeot estate extends over 50 hectares of walled vineyards. It produces one of the best red wines in the world.

Although the Cistercian monks planted the vine around 1100, the current château dates from the 16th century. Nowadays, it is the “Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin” headquarters founded in 1934. Its motto is “Never in vain, always in wine”.

The castle houses the wine museum where you can discover the impressive cellars and presses of the 13th century.

Website of Clos de Vougeot

 

Nuits-Saint-Georges

Town 24 km south of Dijon

Halfway between Beaune and Dijon, the small town of Nuits-Saint-Georges is the capital of the Côte de Nuits vineyards.

The main asset of this picturesque town is its 17th-century belfry. Its beautiful lantern-shaped belfry houses an automatic carillon of several bells that set the town’s pace of life.

The belfry of Nuits-Saint-Georges © French Moments
The belfry of Nuits-Saint-Georges © French Moments

In the winegrowers’ district of Nuits-Saint-Georges is the 13th-century Romanesque church of Saint-Symphorien.

Saint-Symphorien church in Nuits-Saint-Georges © French Moments
The exterior of Saint-Symphorien church in Nuits-Saint-Georges © French Moments

The interior of the church is surprising with its pink and white walls. The sobriety of its architecture is characteristic of the Burgundian Romanesque style.

Saint-Symphorien church in Nuits-Saint-Georges © French Moments
The nave of Saint-Symphorien church in Nuits-Saint-Georges © French Moments

Website of the tourist board of Nuits-Saint-Georges

 

Butte de Vergy

Summit 27 km south of Dijon

The Butte de Vergy is a mystical hillside in the Hautes-Côtes region where the ancient Burgundian and Frankish tribes settled.

It is located between Dijon and Beaune (one could almost speak of the Dijon hinterland!)

Butte de Vergy © MairieReulleVergy - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Butte de Vergy © MairieReulleVergy – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The hill of Vergy is crisscrossed with marked paths. Some lead to the orientation table, and others to the ruins of the former Saint-Vivant monastery (end of the 9th century), a daughter house of the Abbey of Cluny.

In the valley, you can discover several picturesque villages, including Reulle-Vergy. Take a break to admire the 12th and 13th-century church of Saint-Saturnin.

Reulle-Vergy - Église Saint-Saturnin © MairieReulleVergy - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Reulle-Vergy, church of Saint-Saturnin © MairieReulleVergy – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

Also in the village is a curious town hall combined with a washhouse (19th century).

Reulle-Vergy - The town hall and wash house © Christophe.Finot - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Reulle-Vergy – The town hall and washhouse © Christophe.Finot – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

There are two options for reaching the Vergy hillock.

  • The shortest from Dijon: reach Gevrey-Chambertin then take the D31 to Semezanges. Join L’Etang-Vergy by the D35.
  • The longest way: reach Sainte-Marie-sur-Ouche by the A38 and follow the D35 through the château de Montculot.
    You can reach Dijon via Nuits-Saint-Georges (D25).
Vergy Castle Panorama © Christophe.Finot - licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons
Vergy Castle Panorama © Christophe.Finot – licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

 

Aloxe-Corton

Castle 35 km southwest of Dijon

You have to turn off the D974 Dijon-Beaune road to discover the fairytale castle of Corton André, established at the foot of the Corton hill.

The château of Aloxe-Corton in Burgundy © French Moments
The château of Aloxe-Corton in Burgundy © French Moments

The castle and its magnificent roof with glazed tiles typical of Burgundy date from the 19th century. It occupies the site of an 18th-century castle. It is now part of the “Maison Pierre André” wine estate. This vast 150 hectare estate extends over the three communes of Ladoix-Serrigny, Aloxe-Corton and Pernand-Vergelesses and includes the grand crus Corton (red) and Corton-Charlemagne (white).

The château of Aloxe-Corton in Burgundy © French Moments
Entrance gate to the château of Aloxe-Corton in Burgundy © French Moments

Charlemagne? In fact, it is said that in the 8th century, the emperor Charlemagne owned a vineyard of about 70 ouvrées (about 3.5 hectares) behind the present castle. In 775, he donated it to the canons of the Basilica of Saint-Andoche in Saulieu.

 

Savigny-lès-Beaune

Castle 40 km south of Dijon

The wine-growing village of Savigny-lès-Beaune is famous for its imposing castle built around 1340 by Jean de Frôlois, Marshal of Burgundy.

Savigny-lès-Beaune © Marc Ryckaert - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The castle of Savigny-lès-Beaune © Marc Ryckaert – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

Visitors come to the castle to admire the fantastic collections of thousands of Abarth cars, trucks, motorbikes, aeroplanes, as well as vineyard equipment (tractors) and fire-fighting equipment.

The church of Saint Cassien (named after a bishop of Autun) has a massive 12th-century Romanesque bell tower with a square base and an octagonal spire. The choir and transept, in Gothic style, date from the 15th century. The nave and aisles are an 18th-century addition.

Website of Savigny Castle

 

Beaune

Town 40 km south of Dijon

Beaune proudly bears the prestigious title of Burgundy wine capital.

The UNESCO listed town has many relics of its prosperous past. Old houses, churches and ramparts still show that Beaune was an important centre of art and culture in the Middle Ages.

Stroll through the narrow cobbled streets and quiet squares to discover many old buildings such as the Maison du Colombier, the belfry, the Hôtel de la Rochepot, the Maison du Chapitre…

Beaune © French Moments
The roofs of Beaune © French Moments

 

The church of Beaune

The collegiate basilica of Notre-Dame dates from 1125-1130. It is one of the last great Romanesque churches in Burgundy. Reach the garden to see the remains of the late 13th-century cloister.

Beaune © French Moments
The collegiate church of Beaune © French Moments

 

The fortifications walk

The ramparts still enclose the old town. A 2.5km walk takes you along the walkway with views of the watchtowers and bastions.

Beaune © French Moments
Walking on the chemin de ronde of Beaune © French Moments

 

The Hospices de Beaune

The 15th-century hospital known as the Hôtel-Dieu is Beaune’s main tourist attraction.

Hospices de Beaune © French Moments
The courtyard of the Hospices de Beaune © French Moments

 

Nicolas Rolin, chancellor to the Duke of Burgundy, founded a hospital for the poor in 1440. Together with his wife, Guigone de Salins, he wanted to house the sick, the poor and the elderly.

Completed in 1457, the complex is a masterpiece of medieval architecture. Above all, it is an emblem of the golden age of the Grand Duchy of Burgundy.

The hospice is famous for its massive, multi-coloured roof. True to Burgundian tradition, it is decorated with green, yellow, brown and sienna glazed tiles.

Inside, the large “Salle des Pôvres” (Paupers’ Room, 51 metres long) has 28 wooden beds lined up in two rows.

Hospices de Beaune © French Moments
The Paupers’ Room, Hospices de Beaune © French Moments

 

The building also houses Rogier van der Weyden’s marvellous altarpiece of the Last Judgement (15th century).

Website of Beaune Tourist Board

 

Cîteaux

Abbey 24 km south of Dijon

The abbey of Notre-Dame de Cîteaux was founded in 1098 by Saint Robert de Molesme on a plain covered with reeds (or “cistels”, hence the abbey’s name).

This “New Monastery” sought the life of poverty and austerity lived by the monks of earlier years, based on the Rule of St Benedict.

Around Dijon - Cîteaux Abbey - the Library © G CHP - licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons
Cîteaux Abbey – the Library © G CHP – licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

In the 12th century, the abbey experienced a meteoric rise in Christianity. Within 40 years, the humble abbey of Cîteaux became the head of an order of 343 abbeys.

The abbey played a significant role in Burgundy’s wine industry, notably at Clos de Vougeot. It was suppressed during the French Revolution, emptied of its treasures, then transformed into a country house, a refinery, a phalanstery, and then a “disciplinary colony”, a centre for young offenders.

Today, the abbey no longer has any vineyards but produces a very popular cheese, Cîteaux.

The abbey church has long since disappeared. However, the old library (1509) and the long Definitory building (1699) can still be seen.

Website of the abbey

 

Saint-Jean-de-Losnes

Town, 34 km southeast of Dijon

The section of the Burgundy canal from Dijon to the Saône runs in a straight line to Saint-Jean-de-Losne. The town is now France’s leading tourist river port.

The river port of Saint-Jean de Losne © Pline - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The river port of Saint-Jean de Losne © Pline – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The Saint-Jean-Baptiste church dates back to the 16th century and combines the flamboyant Gothic (choir, transept) and Renaissance (nave and portal) styles. A bell tower with turrets tops the church, and the roof has beautiful glazed tiles.

General view of Saint-Jean-de-Losne © Jochen Jahnke - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
General view of Saint-Jean-de-Losne © Jochen Jahnke – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The oldest house in the village dates from the 15th century. It now houses the Maison des Mariniers and its small exhibition on inland navigation.

 

Dole

If you have a little time, you can continue your visit to Dole, the sub-prefecture of the Jura. The historic town is 22 km from Saint-Jean-de-Losnes (about 25 minutes).

Dole © Celeda - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The town of Dole © Celeda – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

Find out more about the Canal of Bourgogne.

 

Auxonne

Town 34 km southeast of Dijon

On the road from Dijon to Dole, Auxonne is an old stronghold, for a long time a border town between the Duchy of Burgundy and the County of Burgundy (Franche-Comté).

The town owes its charm to its castle built by Louis XI and its ramparts on the Saône river lined with shady alleys.

The church of Notre-Dame (13th-15th centuries) is the landmark of Auxonne thanks to its lantern tower. Located above the crossing, it has the particularity of being topped by a slender twisted bell tower.

Around Dijon - Auxonne © GO69 - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Church of Notre-Dame in Auxonne © GO69 – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

Before visiting the interior, take time to look for the gargoyles and statues of prophets that embellish the church’s exterior. Inside, admire the 15th-century Burgundian statues: the Virgin with Grapes (in the absidiole) and the polychrome statue of St Anthony.

The Porte de Comté (Comté Gate), dated from 1503 and was part of the medieval fortifications of Auxonne, now disappeared.

Porte de Comté © G CHP - licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons
Porte de Comté © G CHP – licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

The large tower of the Auxonne castle houses the Bonaparte museum.

Auxonne - the castle and Notre-Dame tower © Christophe.Finot - licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons
Auxonne – the castle and Notre-Dame tower © Christophe.Finot – licence [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

Auxonne Tourist Board website

 

Talmay

Castle 37 km east of Dijon

A castle around Dijon that looks amazing!

With its 13th century square keep topped by a lantern and its neo-classical main building, Talmay castle is worth a visit.

Talmay Castle © JGS25 - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Talmay Castle © JGS25 – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The castle and the French garden are open to visitors. From the top of the tower, there is a fine view of the surroundings. You can see the hills of the Côte d’Or to the west, the Langres plateau to the north, and the first foothills of the Jura to the southeast.

Website of the Talmay Castle

 

Pesmes in Franche-Comté

If you still have some time left, take a trip to the village of Pesmes (Haute-Saône) 22 km to the east. A member of the Most Beautiful Villages in France, Pesmes occupies a picturesque site on the banks of the river Ognon.

Pesmes © JGS25 - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The village of Pesmes © JGS25 – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

 

Venelle Valley

Natural site 36 km north of Dijon

Tourists visiting the area around Dijon will look south towards the vineyards of the Côtes de Nuits and Côtes de Beaune.

Perhaps he will explore the green hills of the Côte d’Or… Rarely will he think of venturing north of Dijon.

And yet, there are some very rural places, where fields, meadows and forests form a relaxing countryside.

To discover them, take the road to Selongey. The church in this town, 36 km north of Dijon dates back to the 13th century.

Then follow the D27 towards Vernois-lès-Vesvres via Foncegrive.

You will pass through the green valley of the Vennelle, a natural area through which the Venelle flows. The site comprises meadows framed by Champ Pensier and the Champberceau forests.

Vernois-les-Vesvres © MAIRIE VERNOIS - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
A pond near Vernois-les-Vesvres © MAIRIE VERNOIS – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

 

Saulx-le-Duc

To the southeast of Selongey and not far from Is-sur-Tille, the small village of Saulx-le-Duc occupies a very picturesque site north of Dijon.

The village houses cling to the eastern slope of the Butte Saint-Siméon. At an altitude of 482 m, the top of the hill offers a panoramic view of the whole region, and on clear days, of Mont Blanc.

Around Dijon - Saulx-le-Duc © Michel FOUCHER - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Saulx-le-Duc © Michel FOUCHER – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

The village has some old Burgundian houses. Some are decorated with statues or sundials.

From the top of the Butte Saint-Siméon, the ruined castle of the illustrious Burgundian noble family of Saulx dominates the surroundings.

There is a good view of the road from Luxerois or the D112 coming from Diénay.

 

Sources of the Seine

Natural site 37 km northwest of Dijon

French pupils learn that the River Seine has its source on the Langres plateau.

This high limestone plateau is located in the departments of Haute-Marne and Côte d’Or. It takes its name from the small historic town of Langres.

But the sources of the Seine are much closer to Dijon than to Langres… in fact, you won’t notice that you are on the Langres plateau… because we are in Burgundy!

The village of Source-Seine from above © Toutoune12 - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The village of Source-Seine from above © Toutoune12 – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
What to see at the sources of the Seine?

At the exact location of the spring (in the commune of Source-Seine) is an artificial cave built in the 19th century to protect it.

It contains a statue of the Seine goddess Sequana, a dog and a dragon.

The grotto at the Source of the Seine © Thesupermat - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The grotto at the Source of the Seine © Thesupermat – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

Since the 19th century, archaeologists have uncovered the buried remains of a Gallo-Roman temple and numerous ancient objects.

This is where the Seine “takes its first steps”…

The baby Seine ! © Clicsouris - licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons
The baby Seine ! © Clicsouris – licence [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

And here is the very first bridge over the Seine!

Pont Paul Lamarche, the Seine's first bridge © Michel Foucher - licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons
Pont Paul Lamarche, the Seine’s first bridge © Michel Foucher – licence [CC BY-SA 4.0] from Wikimedia Commons

In 2020, there are precisely 257 bridges over the Seine (from roads to railways to footbridges) and eight ferry crossings still in use in Normandy.

Curiously, the city of Paris has owned the source of the Seine since 1864. This may no longer be the case soon, as the Burgundy-Franche-Comté region has expressed an interest in acquiring the land around the spring.

Discover the best places to see along the Seine!

 

Châteauneuf-en-Auxois

Village and castle 42 km west of Dijon

The old village of Châteauneuf-en-Auxois dominates the surrounding countryside of the Auxois in a picturesque setting. It is part of the association of the most beautiful villages of France, as is Flavigny-sur-Ozerain.

Châteauneuf-en-Auxois © French Moments
General view of Châteauneuf-en-Auxois © French Moments

From the perched village, there is a magnificent view of the Auxois countryside, the Burgundy canal and the A6, the famous “autoroute du Soleil” linking Paris to Lyon.

The village is laid out in a regular plan around the Grande Rue and the Rue du Centre, with houses dating from the 14th to 18th centuries. The castle that still watches over the village from the top of its medieval towers is worth visiting.

Around Dijon - Châteauneuf - Grand Logis © French Moments
Châteauneuf – Grand Logis © French Moments
Châteauneuf - The half-timbered house, Grande-Rue (right) © French Moments
The half-timbered house, Grande-Rue (right) © French Moments

To find out more about Châteauneuf-en-Auxois, read my dedicated article here.

 

Château de Commarin

Near Châteauneuf, the castle of Commarin dates from the 14th century (moat and two round towers).

The Château de Commarin © Christophe.Finot - license [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons
The Château de Commarin © Christophe.Finot – license [CC BY-SA 2.5] from Wikimedia Commons

However, the present castle is an 18th-century reconstruction in neo-classical style with beautiful French roofs.

It is possible to visit the castle’s interior to discover an intact decoration dating from 1750, the armorial tapestries of the 16th century and the chapel, which shelters a statue of the Virgin of the 15th century.

Website of the Château de Commarin

 

Practical information

Some practical advice to discover the sites around Dijon:

  • You can avoid the traffic jams to get out of/into Dijon by driving outside of rush hour, mainly if you use the western ring road.
  • These 15 places inspire you to discover the region around Dijon (less than 40 km by road). Let yourself be surprised by other discoveries during your escapades, and stay curious! There is so much to discover, especially if you are a lover of small heritage.
  • Don’t hesitate to enter the tourist office centres. During my travels in Burgundy, the receptionists I met know the area and will be happy to help you discover their beautiful region.
  • Organise your accommodation in the area around Dijon here.
  • Visiting the region around Dijon? Think of the following hashtags: #destinationdijon – #lacotedorjadore – #bourgognetourisme – #enfranceaussi – #frenchmoments

 

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About the author

Pierre is a French/Australian who is passionate about France and its culture. He grew up in France and Germany and has also lived in Australia and England. He has a background teaching French, Economics and Current Affairs, and holds a Master of Translating and Interpreting English-French with the degree of Master of International Relations, and a degree of Economics and Management. Pierre is the author of the Discovery Course on the Secrets of the Eiffel Tower and the Christmas book "Voyage au Pays de Noël".

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