Pont l’Évêque, Normandy


Pont l’Évêque is a cheese with a brushed yellow-orange to straw yellow rind.

Pont l’Évêque is a cow’s milk cheese with a soft pâte, a washed yellow-orange to straw yellow rind.
The fat content is at least 45%.

Origins of Pont l’Evêque

This cheese was already greatly appreciated in the Middle-Ages. Its name comes from the little town of Pont-l’Évêque, between Lisieux and Deauville, in Normandy.

It was at first called “angelon” in the 16th century, maybe to recall the precise origin of this cheese developed in the Pays d’Auge, in the Touques valley, particularly aboundant in rich pastures.

It has been known as Pont-l’Évêque since the 17th century.

The production of Pont l’Evêque

Its production area includes the five départements of Normandy and the département of Mayenne in the Pays-de-Loire region.

Pont-l’Évêque is made with cow’s milk with rennet added. The curd is cut and kneaded. In order to help speed up the draining process, the cheese is turned several times in its mould.

After removal from the mould, it is placed on racks to be turned again regularly before being salted with dry salt or brine.

Its affinage may take at least two weeks, with or without washing the rind.

Selection and tasting of Pont l’Evêque

Usually square in shape, it comes in different sizes and weights, from the Petit-Pont-l’Évêque of 85-95 mm to the Grand-Pont l’Évêque which can be up to 190-210 mm in length. Its usual size is a square with a side measuring 105-115 mm.

Pont-l’Évêque is usually a cheese served at the end of a meal.

It goes well with a Bordeaux or Burgundy red wine, but also with a cider from the Pays d’Auge.

Pont l’Évêque received the ‘appellation d’origine contrôlée’ label in 1972.


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